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to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution and unacknowledged by our laws to their acts of pretended legislation. of course the constitution in 1776 was the british constitution. but that concept is the same. there were some foreign jurisdiction is going to have authority over us. we're going to examine now the ideas and practices that those who in our time has combined with others to subject us or tend to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution. ideas have consequences as we learned long ago from an early isi scholar, richard weaver. so let's examine the global governance project. these ideas are not hard to find. you don't have to be invited to seek rebuilder broker conspiracy meeting, any of this out. it's right out in the open on the website, and so u.n., european union, american bar association, dean said most law schools at american universities, all there on the internet. people are not talking about world government. this form of transnational government. so let's look at for people, just some quick views of players who have given a taste of the concept global governance
.s. history that have transformed the laws of the country and illuminated protections afforded to religion in the u.s. constitution. this interview, part of booktv's college series, was recorded at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia. it's about 20 minutes. >> host: university of pennsylvania professor sarah gordon, "the spirit of the law" is her most recent book. what do you mean when you talk about the old constitutional world and the new constitutional world when it comes to religion? >> guest: well, for most of our nation's history, it was the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organizations and so on. and in the early decades of the 20th century, that began to shift as the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and free exercise clauses of the first amendment against the states sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states had the control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did, indeed. but the first amendment beg
hundreds of ordinances and state laws. most of which were unconstitutional. and he didn't know what to do. johnson dearly did not want to send troops, united states army troops, into alabama. his fear was that this would precipitate really a second period of reconstruction. just as the marchers were getting ready to head out in defiance of a court or order, wh hundreds of deputies and troopers waiting for them. fruition came to a very subtle problematic plan that johnson had been working on all night, and king had been listening to all night. johnson said, former -- johnson sent former governor, rely collins, who had taken the job to run the federal con sillation service, on a plane at 2:00 in the morning. he was picked up by assistant attorney general john dore, and was driven to the place where king was staying. king came out of the bedroom wearing a robe and two officials gave him a plan. and lyndon johnson had participated in thinking it up. they said, reverend king, we not only have been talking to you, we've been talking to governor wallace, and he doesn't want anymore bloodshed, an
with the a ministration. the pendant that was put into the law when there were set up which made them an independent voice cannot sell rights, it was really important. they should not try to be friendly with some particular administration. their job was to be a watchdog. a watchdog over with the demonstration was doing. and they learned that. and then when kennedy was assassinated and johnson was uprose civil-rights because of that the civil rights act of '64 and '65, actually enacted into law. >> of a point did you become aware in your life of the civil rights commission? >> i became aware of them when i was in the graduate program university. asked if i work on a project. >> sixty's, 70's. >> yes. i used some of the reports because the reports they did were very good reports. some of the historical research that i did. so i was very much aware of them. finally by the time the commission as to me since i've do legal and constitutional history file would read something of a history of abortion rights for them and how that all played out and what the history had been all the way back to england and so on.
growing a criminal offense under current -- international law. while coca-cola was guaranteed the right to use it as a flavoring in their own product, indigenous peoples across the andes are told that the traditional practice of coca leaf chilling and drinking tea would no longer be tolerated by the international community, and it is important to point out that the u.s. was the architect of these treaties commensurately have support from other countries. today they have key allies in their effort to maintain the treaties such as russia, japan, sweden. really is a u.s. estimate. so coke go along with cannabis and opium became the main targets of the 1961 convention. this historical error, as i like to college, was basically justified by the 1950 report of the commission of inquiry on the coca leaf which is a totally racist document. it is totally, totally racist. has absolutely no scientific evidence. you can find it on the web now. you will be out raised as you read, it is still the basis for the international drug control conventions treatment of coca. subsequent to that in the 1990's
brothers and i grew up a long time ago, back in a time when certain places in our country had unfair laws that said it was right to keep black people separate because our skin was darker and our ancestors had been captured in far off africa and brought to america as slaves. ok. then we came to -- we come now to atlanta, georgia. the city in which we were growing up had those laws. because of those laws, my family rarely went to picture shows. in fact, to this very day, i don't recall ever seeing my father on a street car because of those laws and the indignity that went with them, daddy preferred keeping m.l., a.d., and me close to home where we would be protected. but we lived in a neighborhood in atlanta now called sweet arbor. and this is the street. you can see the cars. you haven't seen cars like that, have you? they don't have any like that now. ok. something like we used to call a t model ford and so tpot. ok. we lived there on the avenue. and on our side of the street, there were two-story frame houses, similar to the one we lived in. across the street crouched a line of one-story
government in his negotiations at the u.n. to codify the laws against coca. what was happening, was in constant medication with the company primary for the vice president, vice pays, who really got to feel the relationship between them over time. they just had a really interesting parlay between each other. so that's the beginning of an overview of the book. i want to pass the mic back and forth and i think we're going to have questions for each other. but that's the beginning. >> at evening. i'm at the super policies were around the trip policy there. i was once asked to check to a group of high school students in the literature resume and background and came up with the topic and you had to speak to the topic. this being a high school dance, they wanted here but sex, drugs and international relations. at that home-equity type these things together. it didn't dawn on me until the last minute and i realized the way to tell that story was through the story of columbus, who i considered the granddaddy of international drug traffickers. how you see the world depends where you say,
to you, i tell you. what you're claiming is loony, and it defies the laws of logic. i've been sitting here across the table from you forever. i've kept my eyes peeled, and there never has been a pinprick of any kind. what's more, this wacky stuff you call space and time has never existed either. nor will it ever exist. why? because nothing comes from nothing. zero plus zero equals zero. the idea that this basic fact could ever change is ridiculous. and it defies the first law of thermodynamics, the law of conservation of energy, a law so basic that every respectable 31st century -- 21st century scientist will declare it thoroughly right. while i in exasperation am trying to get logic across to you, wham, a pinprick shows its head. it's what sid cysts d physicists will someday call a singularity. i'm stunned. this simply does not make sense. but you stay cool and act as if nothing is happening. meanwhile, that pinprick blows up so fast that it makes me dizzy, and sure enough, it has three properties that have never existed before. three properties that if common sense prevailed should
made it a scandal, grover cleveland best friend and law partner. board in new jersey and spent most of his career in buffalo. became the mayor, governor of new york. a very successful lawyer, and there were law partners. the practice law together, went out together, would go out drinking and eating the other. it appears they also enjoyed the services of maria together. so when she gets pregnant she has a son, and neither knew who the father was. she complicates things by naming the child costar cleveland. oscar fulsome had been married and had a daughter. cleveland was a battler, so cleveland kind of accepted responsibility to pay for this child to go for an orphanage. here's where the other part of the scandal comes in. oscar fulsome dies a few years later in the carriage accident. he's driving his carriage and is drawn from it. he leaves a widow and this young girl. cleveland makes an enormous amount of money as his law partner and kind of takes care of the window and the young grow. he pays for them, says the up and i some. his best friend and former law partner. become the godfa
was a graduate of harvard law school, graduated in 1948, worked at major wall street law firm, sherman andsterring and -- sterling and wright, an old and major firm, but he was really bored by corporate law practice. he describes it in his first book which was published in 1968, and it's not really an autobiography, but there's an autobiographical chapter that that's quite interesting. he says, well, there were all these silent victories and muted defeats and these quiet conversations and these, you know, sort of board rooms of our law firm, and he wanted more action than that. and also he loved politics so much, but he really had in some way, shape or form, he had to do it full-time. so he walks away from his law firm in early 1956, comes to washington, lives just a few blocks south of here, somewhere near the was el belling -- russell building or the dirksen build anything a little apartment. and he joins an important anti-communist investigator named robert morris. robert morris' importance in the anti-communist investigations of the 1950s was apparently so significant that whitaker
was a graduate of harvard law school, a graduate 1948, worked at a major corporate law firm on old and major firm but he was really bored by the corporate law practice. he described it in his first book published in 1968 and it's not really an autobiography but there are some of the biographical chapters that are quite interesting. he says well, there's all these silent victories and muted defeats in these quiet conversations in these board rooms of the law firm and he wanted more action than that and he also loved politics so much that he had in some way, shape or form he had to do it full time so he walks away from the wall street law firm in early 1956, comes to washington, lives just a few blocks south of here somewhere near the russell building at a little apartment and he joins a very important anti-communist investigator named robert morris. his importance in the anti-communist investigations of the 1950's was apparently significant that whitaker chambers said in a letter around that time that morris accomplished more of what joe mccarthy is credited with in terms of useful and constructiv
of a role. the point is that rusher did it. rusher had been -- he was a graduate of harvard law school graduated in 1948. he worked at a major wall street law firm now known as sherman in sterling, and old nature firm but he was really bored by corporate law practice. he described it in his first book which was first published in 1968 and is not really an autobiography but an autobiographical chapter this quite interesting. he says while, there will be silent victories and defeats in these quiet conversations in these boardrooms of our law firm and he wanted more action than that. and he also, he loved left politics so much that he really had in some way shape or form he had to do it full-time. so he walks away from his wall street offer in early 1956, comes to washington with lives just a few blocks south of here, somewhere near the russell or the dirksen building and of little apartment and he joins the very important anti-communist investigator named robert morris. robert morris's and points in the anti-communist investigations of the 1950s was apparently so significant that whittak
of representatives. in 1850 they demanded and they got a new law that compelled northern citizens to join posses that were hunting people accused of being runaway shaves who had allege -- slaves who had allegedly escaped into the free states. most of all, the champions of slavery sought ways to retain the control that they had almost continuously exercised over the federal government since the american revolution. and to prevent, above all, to prevent others from using the federal government in ways that might harm the slave owners' interests. in doing this, by the way, they were greatly aided by a clause of the constitution, the so-called three-fifths clause that gave southern whites much heavier representation in the house of respectives than their own numbers otherwise would have warranted. but southerners also sought to increase their representation in both houses of congress as well as in the electoral congress by steadily increasing the number of slave states in the union. and is -- and so it was during the 1840s that they vociferously demanded and lustily cheered both the annexation of te
fundamental set of values and laws. and, um, before that i couldn't -- at first i'd pinch myself. i just couldn't get over the fact that there was no earlier use, and i used all the databases, and i actually got somebody the legislative reference service at the library of congress to actually back me up on it. can you guys find an earlier example of it? at first there was sort of a deep breath saying, oh, my god, this guy's nuts, but the idea was nobody could find it. then somebody said the founding fathers of harvard university or something, but it was never used as a scripter for the -- descriptor for the people who framed the constitution. it's interesting, also, that it really didn't take off until 1941 when a book was written called "founding fathers." but it was immediately adopted by both sides of the aisle although some of the early uses when you go back and track when it starts being used in the '20s more and more often in replacing the word "framers," it's often used as a negative. the founding fathers never meant for us to have pastel-colored postage stamps, or the founding fa
to the convention and he is the law and order candidate. it was the first time it had ever been used as a political motto. there are a couple of things that are in the book that are not american but came from overseas. on that sort of threw me was the first person to use social security was winston churchill. in an essay about modern society. he is the one who created the term social security. some people did really well with this. going through a list of who are the most powerful presidents in terms of language, i think that you have to have roosevelt who is way up there. in 1937 he gives a press conference and he is talking about the supreme court and for some of the decisions of this court, if you ask me, they are iffy. and the next day they talk about the president creating the word effete. the five or six years, anytime they said pardon me but this is iffy. of course, slang gets people in trouble. with the wilson is a great waster. one of the things was what could move on. and he used a lot of campaign type of words. he would come up with these accurate sims, you know and the guardians of the
to process and grow food that is either where the laws are weaker than they can have an easier time dictating policy and increasingly, who's been produced in these countries. if you're talking about organic, it's very difficult to get organic products that are meeting standards. as you can imagine how this is happening in places like china. so what we are advocating and the reason that i wrote "foodopoly" is that we need to do more. it is great for the local foods movement, we have our farm and we love people coming out, but we don't envision that our farm or all of the small farmers market in the area are ever going to be able to really feed the entire population. because you have to be able to distribute these products. the distribution has a stranglehold. so we need to have antitrust laws added to our agenda. and it's beyond the fun things that we all enjoy. we believe there are things even with this dysfunctional congress, we need to jumpstart the conversation about these issues. we live in a system that's supposed to be based on competition. all public policies promote and allow deregula
on national security and law, and co-chairsk the hoover task force on the virtues of a free society. in the past he served as an associate professor at george mason university school of law, and an assistant and associate professor at harvard university. he is the author of virtue and the making of modern liberalism. he holds a jd and a ph.d inñs political science from thisvç institution, an m.a. from hebrew university of jerusalem, and a ba in english literature from swarthmore college. norman podhoretz -- i feel silly introducing these people -- norman podhoretz served as editor-in-chief of "commentary" magazine from 1960-1995, and is their current editor at large. he was awarded the presidential medal of freedom by george w. bush. he served as a senior fellow at the hudson institute and was a senior fellow, and he's the author of many books, and articles including the bush doctrine, what the president said and what it means, world war for. and why are liberal? which should have been entitled why archie is still liberal? he was a pulitzer prize call at colombia university where
the company knows you don't bowl, you don't cut your own law. it's merely covering the track so is that what it knows doesn't seem so spooky. all right. let me finish with another question. i actually like the way i'm finishing. are there are good things about statistics, scary things about statistics, and then there are places where we're watching unfold right now in real-time. this is some of the most interesting stuff. one of the questions at the end of the book is how can we identify and reward good teachers and schools? my wife is a public school math teacher. so she has has been involved in this realm. we need good schools and we need good teachers in order to have good schools. it follows logically we ought to reward good teachers and good schools and firing bad teachers and closing bad schools. how do we do that? test scores give us an objective measure of student performance, yet we know that some students will do much better on a standardized test for other reasons that have nothing to do with what is going on inside the classroom or the school. the seemingly simple solution is to
that are not authorized by law. number six, congress routinely raids the social security trust fund to cover general revenue shortfalls. >> guest: looking at the appropriation bills and not done the last two years and say we appropriate x amount of money it is over $350 billion that which is not funded and it tells you there is the imbalance in congress had we appropriate funds we have not said we spend money on? that tells you the power of the benefit going back to what is the most important but is it more important to think what is the health of the country and the long run? to put yourself on the losing side of every argument coming have to work hard to explain yourself. >> members of congress to not have the opportunity to read the bills they vote on. >> one of the most secret and intimate -- ways is to report language only members of the committee can vote or amend. each year congress spends countless hours to debate the budget resolution and has no intention of keeping. number 10, congress circumvents its own budget limits to avoid public scrutiny by exploiting its own budget. >> guest: those
his eyes had been. so this comes back to yale law school. there he meets hillary rodham.
pay some poor kenyan for some? so it's been that kind of situation. >> host: you've been to law e, texas, kansas for your research on this and now you are in kenya when does the research part of it in the? >> guest: you just know when you get there. actually the research never ends. there is a point i say i am ready to start writing. i started this book the essentially the day after obama was elected president that's when i decided i'd got to do this book. i'd written a few pieces for "the washington post" before that so i had a basis of research particularly on his mother, and i think when i get home from this incredible journey i will have the kansas side of the story pretty much completed and that's where the story begins, it's a weaving these incredible worlds that helped create this person. >> host: who came up with the title? >> guest: i did. i was just bouncing around of africa and then i set out of africa come out of dalia, kansas, indonesia, chicago, out of this world. the book is two things it's the world that created obama and then how he recreate himself so i'm not sur
coolidge the law and order candidate. the phrase was rarely used before but it was the first time it was used as a political motto. again there are various people who i have to list is the best. there are couple of things that are in the book that are not american that came from overseas. israili is a real dark horse which is part of the political language and one that threw me a bit was the first person to use social security was winston churchill. in 1906 in an essay about modern society and what has to be done but he is the one who creates the term social security. there are some people that really do well with it. i think if you had a list of who were the most powerful presidents in terms of language i think you have -- frankly roosevelt has to be way up there. not only the phrases are but if he -- iffy he's talking about the supreme court insist some of these decisions of the supreme court if you ask me our iffy. next day the lead of the papers was in fact the president created the word today iffy and for five or six years anytime a columnist in the tribune said pardon me
instead of 2004, in 1989, as he is going off to boston, correct, the harvard law school. >> guest: yes. >> host: so to barack obama is finally going to make and appeared in your book. is this about halfway through the book? >> guest: not halfway. it's 164 pages into it. >> host: we get to hawaii. again, how did his parents meet? >> guest: well, his mother was 17. she was a freshman at the university of hawaii. >> host: i apologize to take it one step back. how did she get to hawaii? >> guest: she got to hawaii because her father, put in a furniture salesman in mercer island, or in seattle, washington, he got a job selling furniture in honolulu. and he was always looking for the next thing. principally moved west. from california to california. to seattle and then from seattle to hawaii. and so she came along with the family. she was only 17 and she graduate from high school, and actual public school in seattle post might only child. >> guest: and she was the only child. her name was stanley in. his name was stanley. i can tell you the story about some other time. in any case, so she is
where it's cheaper, in countries where the environmental laws are weaker, where they can have a even easier or time dictating policies. and so increasingly our foods are being produced in these countries. and if you're talking about organics, it's very difficult to each verify in the u.s -- to even verify in the u.s. that organic products are meeting the standards. so we can imagine how this is happening in places like china. so basically what we're add advocating and the reason i wrote "foodopoly" is that we need to do more than vote with our fork. it's great, the local foods movement is fabulous. you know, i have a farm. we love our farm, we love people coming out, but we don't envisions that our farm -- envisions that our farm or all of the farmers markets in the d.c. area are ever going to b able to really feed the entire population there. because you have to be able to distribute these products and these grocery stores and the distribute chain have a stranglehold. so we need to add anti-trust law to our good food agenda, and we need to start talking about these deeper issues bey
was recorded by the sola police and then fell into the law enforcement hands which was actually what they thought at the time, the people in the civil rights movement fought. was the police making of the intrusions face of the fbi as their friends which relatively speaking the fbi agents on the ground. it's a complex period. you have a hostile political part of the fbi and a relatively friendly, crimefighting part of the fbi coexisting at a time when the movement is under constant danger, the various scattered movement throughout the south. c-span: "parting the waters," your first book was published in what your? >> guest: at the end of 1988. c-span: was the per code that you discussed? >> guest: 54 to 63. the year the brown decision, the year the supreme court unanimously said in effect their racial segregation and subornation is in conflict with the american constitution, kind of reading the challenge of the civil war period about slavery being in conflict with promise of equal citizenship. though that's 54, i'm going to 68 when that movement, built on that premise, largely dissolv
. but we are not in the business of making law. we also have an instinct for wanting to have access. so there's a distinction between, for example, supporting the concept of copyrights and whether they should last 85 years or longer. and what kind of access to digital capacities exist for books that are not being sold. these are really serious questions. because suddenly we have locked up in every library in america books that are not being sold that a lot of people would like to have access to, if it was free. and that's for digitization basically provides. and so to some degree people are going to have to come to grips with it. there's a secondary issue, by the way, in terms of the visual arts, where artists, families for extended periods of times have copyright in effect, powe powers, over great works of art. and how long that should last is a really powerful question. i will tell you as someone who came from a legislative background, that fairly narrow commercial interests really dictated a process during a particular period of time. i doubt if exactly the same decisions on extendin
to gather your story. and interestingly enough, a colonel in the battalion said my father in law was a loop pilot in world war ii on the eastern front. had this immediate reports and within five minutes they were engaged in combat. what was so striking and interesting, this young marine was killed, he got up and said i want to see a symphony of fire. according to general pattern that they and everyone of us including me, was on with an m-16 because i wanted to survive that they fired down the block and suppressed those people. several years later we came back and i was given the honor of taking the fifth marines which he lead at that time to normandy and we toward the normandy battlefields with the men i was in volusia -- fallujah with and we went to pointe du hoc which is the subject of this book "dog company" which i am going to talk about. it was called we were one which is the battle of fallujah. when we pointe du hoc on those windswept beaches on that peninsula it was a magical moment, people i've fought with in fallujah and we went back in time to world war ii. let me take you back in
an enormous amount of money as his law partner and kind of takes care of the widow and young girl and pays for them, says them up in a nice home. he becomes the godfather of the little girl, francis. they are very close. she calls them uncle cleve. he closer frankie. he pays to send her to college. but happens is francis is growing up and her relationship changes from uncle cleve to godfather to a romantic interest. cleveland started sending her letters. it's the full-court press on courting her. >> now joining us here on her booktv set is trained to. her most recent book is so spoke the earth -- "so spoke the earth". in january 2010, where were you? >> i was here in miami and the deeper market with my daughter when someone called me and said there had been an earthquake in haiti. of course so many lives were changed at a loss to family members and many friends in the country that something like 200,000 people. >> host: when did you get to haiti after the earthquake? >> guest: i had a little baby at the time, slated back until three weeks later to see some family and friends and how they w
. southern states were recruiting industries, passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so, states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california and arizona, north carolina, are all being transformed in the post world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. this real -- this period from 1964 to 2008 could be thought of as kind of the period of the sun belt dominance in american presidential history. you think about every president elected from 1964 to 2008 comes from a state of the sun belt, lyndon johnson, texas. richmond nixon, california. gerald ford, was not elected. so he doesn't count. he was from michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. the first george bush from texas via connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas. so 2008 in some ways watershed election. ends the 40-yea
year we were talking about pipa and sopa, a law rushing through congress because the copper lobby is so strong which would have allowed, basically anyone in the world to shut down any internet web site. and thank god that was stopped. and it was stopped in part because it started here with members of congress holding a press conference saying this must be stopped. innovation is too important consumer access to the internet is too important, we have to do something about it. and now that sopa and pipa is dead, it's like name your kid adam. no one will do it ever again. >> host: gary shapiro, do you have an opinion on who you'd like to see replace julius genachowski at the fccing? >> chairman genachowski i called him the spectrum chairman yesterday. he has done a phenomenal job in defining his job as looking towards the future of america in the next 5-10 years and our spectrum needs. and he has pushed the ball forward. i am eager to not see him leave. the commission is there have galvanized as a body. of course, they disagree on some things, but he's united the commission with a mission,
on his legislative proposals. he should recommend a creative revision of the tax laws, the serious debt and debt reduction program. he should have congress enacted budget which has not occurred for the past three years. he might come up with a proposal for inventing public-private partnerships to improve infrastructure, including the electric grid. and, of course, continue to encourage energy independence. the resolution of the supply of unfilled housing should be tried but only if a reelected barack obama can somehow find a unique instrument required to work with this administration to move to the center and discover ways to reach meaningful compromise with the congresswoman to pass legislation that this country so desperately needs. although it's not a -- one can ask will he be reelected. historically rarely have presidents been real elected to a second term with popular ratings in the 40% level, which is where obama rests, but so does romney. interesting to note that only three of the 19 presidents elected to a second term as relatively less popularity ratings at the time of their re
hipaa and sopa about the law of rushing through congress because the lobbyists is so strong that would allow anyone in the world to shut down any internet web site by claiming copyright infringement and thank god that was. was stopped because it started here with members of congress holding a press conference saying this must be stopped. innovation is too important in consumer access to the internet is to import and we have to do some ring about. we will never have legislation like that again in congress. it's like name your kid adolf. no one will ever do it again. >> host: gary shapiro do you have an opinion on who you would like to replace julius genachowski at the fcc? >> guest: i call them the spectrum chairman yesterday. he is in a phenomenal job in defining his job as looking towards the future of america in the next five or 10 years in our spectrum is and he is pushed it forward. i'm eager to not see him leave. the commissioner there are has galvanized and of course we disagree in some things but not necessarily by political party more. he has united the commission. i think they
his eyes have been. until he comes back to yale law school. there he meets hillary them. >> you can watch this and other programs on line at booktv.org.
with congress on his legislative proposal. he should recommend a creative revision of the tax law, serious debt reduction program. should encourage college to enact an annual budget that occurred for the past three years. he might come up with a proposal for inventive public or of a partnership to improve infrastructure, including the electric grid and of course continue to encourage any energy independence. the resolution of unsold houses should be sought, but all of this will occur only if a reelected barack obama could somehow find the unique temperament required to work with his administration, to move to the center and discover ways to reach meaningful compromise with a congress willing to pass legislation the country so desperately needs. what is not a subject of this paper, one can ask and will he be reelected? rarely have presidents been reelected to a second term as popularity ratings in the 40% level, which is where obama rests. so does romney. it's interesting to note only three of 19 presidents elected to a second term had relatively less popularity rating at the time of the reelect
law that eventually came apart in 1964. the student newspaper supported the marchers. we had some black students in chapel hill at that time and felt that if they couldn't eat in the same restaurants with all the rest of us, that budget right. and so all of these photographs were taken initially for either the student newspaper or for i served as a string err for some of the -- stringer for some of the local wire services and what not. today in publishing the book one of the purposes was to let some of today's generation who still live in chapel hill and are descendants from the people in photographs know and understand what their parents and grandparents did so that they can enjoy the same freedoms that in some manner they take for granted often today to be able to go into a lunch counter or wherever. >> host: so 1961-1964, and i'm guessing you can speak to the majority of these and you can recall the moment? we're looking at this one right here, group of folks in front of a merchant's association. >> guest: after having picketed for a number of months, they decided it was time t
that are not authorized by law. number six, congress routinely raise the social security trust fund to cover general revenue shortfalls. >> guest: if you look at the appropriation bills come which have not been on the last two years because of the political dynamic going on and you go when they were put in x amount of money and look at how many programs, it's over $350 billion now. programs that are funded that are not authorized by the congress. which tells you there's an imbalance in congress is heavily appropriate funds for a program we haven't said we should be spending money on any toes see you the power of the appropriations committees in the power of pork or benefit to the states. what's most important? is the most important to look at an oklahoma at the amount of money i can direct their? or is it more important to think of the long run, with the help of our country in the long run and how do we make this type decisions? politically puts you on the losing side of every argument, that you work hard to explain yourself. poster number seven, members of congress don't have the opportunity to rea
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